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Culture, self and the emergence of reactance : is there a “universal” freedom?

[journal article]

Jonas, Eva; Graupmann, Verena; Kayser, Daniela Niesta; Zanna, Mark; Traut-Mattausch, Eva; Frey, Dieter

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Abstract In this article we suggest that independent vs. interdependent aspects of the self yield different manifestations of psychological reactance and that this is especially relevant in a cross-cultural context. In Studies 1, 2 and 4 we showed that people from collectivistic cultural backgrounds (individuals holding more interdependent attitudes and values) were less sensitive to a threat to their individual freedom than people from individualistic cultural backgrounds (individuals holding more independent attitudes and values), but more sensitive if their collective freedom was threatened. In Study 3 we activated independent vs. interdependent attitudes and values utilizing a cognitive priming method and yielded similar results as the other studies hinting at the important causal role of self-related aspects in understanding reactance in a cross-cultural context.
Classification Social Psychology
Free Keywords Reactance theory; culture; self
Document language English
Publication Year 2009
Page/Pages p. 1068-1080
Journal Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45 (2009) 5
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2009.06.005
Status Postprint; peer reviewed
Licence PEER Licence Agreement (applicable only to documents from PEER project)